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Hello from North Yorkshire, UK

Posted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 1:03 pm
by jonno51
Hello all,

Joined today after buying an 1100, which will be delivered next week. Had an 1100 about 20 years ago, but since then I've mainly had sportsbikes or tourers apart from a year when I had a VN800 Drifter as a second bike.

The bike I've bought has done 60k miles but is in good condition. I'll be doing all the usual checks before I take it out (fluids, pads, battery charge etc) although with the weather here "taking it out" could mean March next year.
I do a lot of my own work on my bikes so I'm looking forward to a simple bike with no fuel injection, no liquid cooling and no fairings.
Based on my recollections of the last XV, I'll definitely be changing the fork oil and putting progressive springs in, as well as installing some Ricor Intiminators (cartridge emulators). As luck would have it I have a pair of 38mm ones from another bike that I can use.

No similar site exists in the UK for Virago owners, which is why I am here.I look forward to along and happy association

Re: Hello from North Yorkshire, UK

Posted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 1:39 pm
by ViragoJoe
Hello Jonno,
Welcome to Virago Help. Glad you're here. Hopefully, we can help you in some way, as well as, you helping us.

Post some pictures, we'd like to see your bike and you on it if you like.

Joe

Re: Hello from North Yorkshire, UK

Posted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:33 pm
by jsyzdek
1995 XV1100
I just started a new thread on the topic and found this now. So I see that the main recommendation for the springs is to go progressive. The thing is that with a relatively heavy bike, the soft part of the spring gets used up with just the bike itself. I've had good luck with straight springs in my past bikes and I'm wondering if anyone has tried such springs, and if yes, what kind of spring constant you went with and what was the outcome (just right, too soft, too stiff).

Re: Hello from North Yorkshire, UK

Posted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 6:29 am
by ViragoJoe
jsyzdek wrote:
Mon Feb 17, 2020 11:33 pm
1995 XV1100
I just started a new thread on the topic and found this now. So I see that the main recommendation for the springs is to go progressive. The thing is that with a relatively heavy bike, the soft part of the spring gets used up with just the bike itself. I've had good luck with straight springs in my past bikes and I'm wondering if anyone has tried such springs, and if yes, what kind of spring constant you went with and what was the outcome (just right, too soft, too stiff).

"I've had good luck with straight springs in my past bikes and I'm wondering if anyone has tried such springs, and if yes, what kind of spring constant you went with and what was the outcome (just right, too soft, too stiff)."


Don't compare your newly acquired Virago with other bikes you've had. Bike geometries are different. Some bike engineers hit things right on the money others do not. I believe the engineer that designed the front forks for the larger Virago's miss calculated and made them too mushy with straight springs. Progressive springs have corrected all the issues I had with the standard straight springs. Place your Virago on the center stand. Take a marker and place a small line at the rubber dust cover. Place a jack under the engine with a block of wood between jack and engine. Jack up the bike. You will see how much preload the forks have. Then with the bike on side stand alone. Up right the while saddling it. Sit down with minimal pressure on the floor with your feet and have someone draw another line at the dust cover. Place bike on the center stand again and jack up the bike at the engine. You will be shocked how much travel there is with the standard springs. Change to progressive springs, do the same thing and see the difference. Big difference in travel. You'll thank me later.

The Virago straight springs coils are too close together from the jump. With added weight they become even closer. The wire and push back is way to soft. Progressive Springs have a heavier wire and the coils are not consistent regarding the space between each coil. Bike handling is better and firmer especially when cornering. As for the floor boards you mentioned in one of your other posts. These Progressive Springs should also help with that. Folks always forget. Floor boards were and meant for larger cruisers for comfort. Virago's are mid range cruisers and weren't really designed for wide floor boards. Have I ever laid the bike over to scrap a foot peg on the ground. Sure I have, glad they fold up or I would have downed the bike.

Ever ride the tail of the dragon or seen videos of folks riding it. Most of the bikes that go off the road are cruisers with floor boards. Large cruisers aren't meant for the tail of the dragon. Made for open roads without tight curves.

If you still have chicken strips on your tires, I suggest you clean them off. Not doing so may have your Kister meeting the road.